Ballpark Digest

Saturday, Aug 23rd

Last update06:14:00 AM GMT

You are here: Minor League Visits Cooper Stadium / Columbus Clippers

Cooper Stadium / Columbus Clippers

E-mail Print PDF
Article Index
Cooper Stadium / Columbus Clippers
Page 2: History in the Concourse
Page 3: In the Meantime
Page 4: Stories of the Game
All Pages
One of the oldest ballparks in North America still in use in affiliated ball (it opened in 1932), Cooper has added a few modern amenities like rooftop suites, a picnic area and some between-inning activities. But the main gist of a visit here is to experience old-time baseball in an old-time setting with old-time values. It is not hard to sit down, close your eyes and envision Nick Cullop hitting one of his 22 triples in 1933, Harry Brecheen sneaking strike three past an unsuspecting hitter or Willie Stargell flogging a shot into Dysart Park behind the right fence. Editor's note: This story dates from the final season pro baseball was played at Cooper Stadium.

FAST FACTS

Year Opened: 1932
Capacity: 15,000
Owner: Franklin County, Ohio
Dimensions: 355L, 385LC, 400C, 365RC, 330R
Original Cost: $450,000
Playing Surface: Grass
Suites: 24
Website: clippersbaseball.com
Phone: 614/462-5250
League: International League
Parent: Washington Nationals
Parking: $3
Address/Directions: 1155 W. Mound St., Columbus, OH 43223-2298. Directions from the north: take I-71 S or ST. RT. 315 S to I-70 W. Take I-70 W to exit 98 B (Mound St.). Go straight at the light to enter our main driveway, Driveway #1, or turn left to enter Driveway #2 or Driveway #3. Directions from the south: take I-71 N to I-70 W. Take I-70 W to exit 98 B (Mound St.). Go straight at the light to enter our main driveway, Driveway #1, or turn left to enter Driveway #2 or Driveway #3.
Written by: Dave Wright
Photos by: Jim Robins

Cooper Stadium closed a long run as home to the Clippers in September 2008. The team will play 2009 and beyond at a new downtown ballpark. This is our 2007 visit to the ballpark.

The first thing I noticed when I entered Cooper Stadium was the old-fashioned telephone at the main desk. It was a large red rotary-dial phone, the type you tell the kids about. If the woman running the desk had an ear piece and a microphone attached to it, you might have thought you had driven to the wrong place and you were really at League Park in Cleveland in 1948. All that would be missing was finding out whether Bob Feller was pitching that day.

It's a very appropriate way to begin because going to a game at Cooper Stadium is like stepping into a time machine. One of the oldest ballparks in North America still in use in affiliated ball (it opened in 1932), Cooper has added a few modern amenities like rooftop suites, a picnic area and some between-inning activities. But the main gist of a visit here is to experience old-time baseball in an old-time setting with old-time values. It is not hard to sit down, close your eyes and envision Nick Cullop hitting one of his 22 triples in 1933, Harry Brecheen sneaking strike three past an unsuspecting hitter or Willie Stargell flogging a shot into Dysart Park behind the right fence. Listen closely and you might hear Jack Buck, who began his Hall of Fame career as the team's broadcaster in 1950, call the game in his wry, humorous fashion.

A mural outside the ballpark lists the two previous names of the ballpark -- Red Bird Stadium and Jet Stadium -- and previews the new ballpark.